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Research. Design. Deliver.


This site showcases different projects I've completed over my UX career, and provides a glimpse of my personality and UX philosophy. In addition to work samples, I share insights that have shaped my approach toward research and design, as well educating UX students.

For employers and recruiters, you can download a current version of my résumé here:

John Neumann résumé/CV

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Research. Design. Deliver.


This site showcases different projects I've completed over my UX career, and provides a glimpse of my personality and UX philosophy. In addition to work samples, I share insights that have shaped my approach toward research and design, as well educating UX students.

For employers and recruiters, you can download a current version of my résumé here:

John Neumann résumé/CV

basement-health-association-st-louis.jpg

Insights Snapshot


A quick read on what's top of mind.

Insights Snapshot


A quick read on what's top of mind.

I thrive on solving interoperability problems.

The maturation of Design in successful organizations has opened the door for creative problem solving as a process. Whatever your flavor of Agile or Lean UX, there is going to be a level of planning, exploration, problem identification, ideation, and ultimately, delivery of a solution. But these solutions are rarely linear. While form may follow function, focus has shifted to designing within an ecosystem, while considering the needs and dependencies of organizations and multiple users. Understanding how things work together on a physical level is only the beginning. Our users expect products and applications to work seamlessly with other products, and perhaps most importantly, with other people. Approaching design with an expanded view of a product's potential applications has allowed me to research and design solutions that not only add value, but provide a differentiated experience that can translate into competitive advantage. 


Teaching has been more rewarding than I ever expected.

In addition to my recent work at Express Scripts and IBM, I began teaching in the evenings at Austin Community College for several reasons. I had a strong desire for more community engagement, needed a way to stay busy and keep my skills sharp, and wanted to better prepare students for the realities of careers in UX. Many new hires I've worked with have been unprepared for the demands of high-velocity design teams. Stereotypes aside, I've always believed that as human beings we appreciate the feeling of achievement. I've made it my mission to influence the way my students approach problems. As such, we create research methodologies and instruments to capture exactly the kind of data required to understand a user's motivations. My students learn when to leverage their design sensibility, and when to seek help where domain knowledge is lacking. The key to all of this is being encouraged to step outside of your comfort zone long enough to grow through the experience, and then return to a working environment that grants creative license to those willing to go further in delivering unique, well-crafted assets. It's all paid off in spades. Seeing students land their first internships, full-time roles, and a few getting admitted to prestigious university HCI programs has made me so proud I can't describe it in words. Safe to say all the clichés are true.


Design research in a Lean or Agile environment is more difficult to execute (well) than rigorous academic research.

As someone who completed a terminal degree at a blistering pace, I'm familiar with all-nighters and crunching data until you can't see straight. Yet I'd argue that for all the rigor required to produce peer-reviewed research in academia, it's much harder to execute valid design research. The rapid turnarounds required from an Agile design team impose all manner of threats to the validity of any research. Small sample sizes. Accelerated test schedules. Limited budgets. Barriers to user access. The list goes on, and ultimately it requires not only a mastery of available research tools, but the ability to think creatively to control variability while determining the "what" and the "why" behind user behaviors (in 2 weeks or less quite often). Capturing valid data while simultaneously developing lasting empathy takes commitment and a desire to push yourself to look beyond the first viable solution to the optimal one. This is a topic I can go on about at length, and if we're fortunate enough to chat I'd love to share more about my philosophy in merging the rigor of academia with the demands of Lean product development. I’ve spoken on this topic in 2018 and 2019, and continue to evangelize the need to balance qualitative insights with analytics and multiple data sources.